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Social Studies

World Civilizations I

Grade 9
Required
Full Year
Prerequisites: none

This course surveys the major themes, events, and individuals that helped mold the development of mankind in Europe and beyond. The text, “World History, Perspectives on the Past,” will be used as the focal point of our study. This will be supplemented by source materials which will enhance a humanities-based approach to the study of history. Students will be responsible for all textbook readings, source materials, and lecture information. The goals of this course are multiple: to increase student skills in the areas of note taking, writing, oral expression, and critical analysis; to familiarize students with the methods of historiography and research; and to help students appreciate and become aware of the interconnectedness of the humanities.

World Civilizations II

Grade 10
Required
Full Year
Prerequisites: none

This course will study South and East Asia, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa as their civilizations were formed and as they have been altered during the past two to four centuries by the “forces of modernity.” Time will be spent defining the major traditional features of each civilization, especially how cultures persisted and changed and what those forces of modernity have been. A comparative approach will be stressed with each civilization compared at major stages to others. This will be broken down into how each culture is governed, how it explains and represents the world, how it supports itself, and how it structures social groups. The course readings will stress types of historical evidence and problems of conflicting interpretation—two skills areas that go beyond straight memorization.

U.S. History

Grade 11
Required
Full Year
Prerequisites: none

United States History is a required course for juniors. Part of the reason for this is that the state mandates the teaching of United States history. Beyond that, however, it is valuable and, in fact, necessary to have an understanding of our nation’s past. Human beings are not created in a vacuum. They are a product of many factors, genetic and cultural. True self-knowledge requires an understanding of the heritage of not only the family and community but also the nation. This course will help to bring about some knowledge of the latter. Naturally, the value of studying the history of one’s own country is also evident in preparing one to be an aware and contributing member of society.

AP U.S. History

Grade 11
Elective to U.S. History
Full Year
Prerequisites: B or higher in World Civilizations II and department approval based on grades and writing skills as demonstrated in World Civilizations I/II

As an alternative to the required U.S. history course for juniors, Park Tudor offers an opportunity for highly motivated and academically abler students to take Advanced Placement U.S. History. This course approximates an entry-level college survey course, and as such requires a willingness to work independently as well as strong skills in reading, notetaking, analytical thinking and writing, and processing substantial amounts of information. Reading assignments are demanding and typically cover eight to ten pages of college-level reading material per class, as well as outlining or reading notes. Regular participation in class discussions is required. A second semester term paper enables students to explore in depth a topic of their choosing relating to U. S. history. It also provides Global Scholars students with the opportunity to begin developing some of the research and writing skills they will need to complete their Global Scholars project.

AP World History

Grade 12
Elective
Full Year
Prerequisites: Students currently enrolled in AP U.S. History must maintain a B average or higher; students currently in regular U.S. History may elect to take the course if they earn an A- or higher.

The Advanced Placement course in World History takes a panoramic, “big history” view of historical processes and contacts. By taking a global perspective, students gain an understanding of broad themes and patterns of change over time, and an appreciation for competing points of view regarding historical events. This course requires strong skills in reading, note-taking, and analytical thinking, with assignments that cover eight to ten pages of reading per class, and a mindset open to diversity of interpretations and explanations. Ultimately, students are prepared for success on the AP World History exam in May and educated as global thinkers. The knowledge base gained in AP World History, forms a strong foundation necessary for any career, in an increasingly multicultural nation and globally connected world.

Microeconomics

Grades 11-12
Elective
1st Semester
Prerequisites: none

This course prepares the student in microeconomics. Concepts such as economic growth, money and banking, aggregate demand and supply, fiscal policy, and international trade are the heart of this course.

Macroeconomics

Grades 11-12
Elective
2nd Semester
Prerequisites: none

This course examines the functioning of the firm and the role of government as well as externalities, public goods, and taxes. If students perform well on the Advanced Placement exam, they could receive college credit. (Students who enroll in Macroeconomics without taking Microeconomics may be asked to complete some readings prior to the start of class.)

International Relations

Grades 10-12
Elective
One Semester
Prerequisites: Sophomores require department approval

This class provides a critical assessment of the major theories and concepts which define international relations as a field of study. It provides a detailed analysis of explanatory theories (such as realism, idealism, structuralism, neo-liberalism, interdependence, functionalism) and of core concepts (including sovereignty, national interest, collective security, balance of power). The class also examines the historical evolution of international systems, with a focus on the modern state system. Special attention is given to the processes and institutions (for example international law, United Nations, NGOs, international civil society) that contribute to conflict resolution and international cooperation. Major themes include peace and global security in the 21st century; the environment, demography, and sustainability; globalization, development, and human rights; as well as technological change and the transformation of the global economy.

Park Tudor’s participation in the Model United Nations program at Universities of Dayton, Chicago, Georgetown and the International Conference in The Hague is used also as a mechanism for understanding the mission of the United Nations organization in international relations. The cultural aspects of the field of international relations are also addressed, by examining the role of beliefs, culture, religion, salient identities and race in interstate and intra-state behavior. In this light several literary and filmic sources are used.

Psychology

Grades 11-12
Elective
One Semester
Prerequisites: Biology, and either Chemistry or Conceptual Chemistry

The emphasis of this course is on psychology as it applies to everyday life, especially the lives of high school students. We intend to make psychological research practical and relevant via the activities and assignments presented in class. For example, not only will we examine some basic conceptions of clinical psychology, social psychology, educational psychology, sports psychology, forensic psychology and physiological psychology, but the students can expect that for each topic studied they also will participate in activities that allow them to experience the discipline.

Sociology

Grades 10-12
Elective
2nd Semester
Prerequisites: Sophomores require department approval

Sociology is the systematic study of human societies and of humans in social settings. This one-semester, discussion-oriented elective provides students with a way of looking at their social organization as well as their experiences in terms of what is going on around them. Areas investigated include: sociological theories and perspectives; culture; social structure; socialization; social institutions (family, education, religious, political, economic, sports); social control; population; and social change. Reading assignments direct the discussion and group exercises. Throughout the semester the students will “do” sociology by preparing analyses and essays on sociological concepts, societal statistics and social issues.

Military History I - American Civil War

Grades 10-12
Elective
1st Semester
Prerequisites: Department approval. Ideally, students have earned a B average or higher in history courses.

In this seminar-style course, students will examine closely the social and military events related to the progression of the Civil War—from the home front to the battlefield. Course materials will include wartime documents, newspapers, letters, diaries and original military papers. Students will learn to decipher 19th century script in letters and government pensions, locate photographs, maps and other primary source materials. Hands-on work will enable students to become true Civil War scholars. A final project is required in lieu of a final exam. The class may also include a trip to the National Archives in Washington to examine Civil War Pension records and/or attend the Civil War Conference at Pamplin Park in Petersburg, VA.

Military History II - World War II

Grades 10-12
Elective
2nd Semester
Prerequisites: Department approval. Ideally, students have earned a B average or higher in history courses.

Students will examine the Second World War from a global perspective, comparing the experiences of each of the major belligerents. Whether covering the home front, Holocaust, or a particular military campaign; students will examine the social, political, economic and technological factors that contributed to how the belligerents waged war, and, in turn how the war affected each of the belligerents. The course will cover how and why the belligerents planned and executed particular strategies and operations in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific, and China-India- Burma Theaters. Finally, this course examines the interrelationship of sea, air, and land forces, and the complexities of providing logistical support to joint and combined operations on such an unprecedented scale.

Students will follow chronologically ordered topics. Each of the topics will be supplemented whenever possible by Park Tudor’s collection of original diaries, letters, and wartime journals. Hands-on work will encourage students to delve more deeply into topics that are of particular interest. A final project is required in lieu of a final exam. The class may also include a trip to the National Archives to work on Legacy World War II projects, or to participate in the European World War II trip (World War II and the Western Front) in June 2018.

Social History and Ethics Seminar

Grade 12
Elective
One Semester
Prerequisites: none

Ethics is an interdisciplinary course that studies contemporary issues for the purpose of understanding why individuals and/or groups make certain moral choices. Identities are inextricably connected to these choices and, as a result, inform how people see themselves and the world around them. Students are challenged in this class to critically analyze and evaluate the historical/cultural process involved in making ethical decisions. As students explore the values espoused by different people, they gain a clearer picture of the world in which they live and develop their abilities to make informed and responsible decisions for their own lives.

U.S. Government and Political History

Grade 12
Elective
One Semester
Prerequisites: none

This course is a one-semester elective designed to challenge students to think critically about various historical/cultural realities created by American government since its inception. Included in our work will be a survey of political history, institutions, rights and liberties that will enable us to understand the American political system. Knowledge of this system, which John Quincy Adams once described as “the most complicated on the face of the globe,” is vital for citizens to be active in a representative democracy.

Humanities: Gender, History and Society

Grades 11-12
Elective
One Semester
Prerequisites: none

Classes in the Humanities - English, History, World Languages, Visual and Performing Arts - form the core of any liberal arts education. In these classes, students immerse themselves in a rich variety of traditional and contemporary texts; they examine the human experience through history and across a wide range of cultural perspectives; and they develop a deeper appreciation of how the arts help individuals to both explore and express the fullness of the human spirit. The overlapping concerns of these fields naturally lend themselves to interdisciplinary studies, providing unique opportunities for intellectual inquiry and interpreting the world through a variety of lenses.

In this semester course, open to juniors and seniors, we will undertake a comprehensive examination of the powerful influence that gender and race have had on the lives of Americans both past and present. Utilizing a wide variety of media - including texts, primary source documents, films, blogs and music - we will first survey the influence that gender and race have had on the development of American society. Then we will consider the ways in which gender and race continue to shape Americans through the texts they read, the media they use, the products they buy—not to mention how they interpret contemporary events. Accordingly, we will also explore the interplay between gender and race, and such things as sports, the workplace, the legal system, ethnicity, religion, and class. Course readings, viewings and discussions will be supplemented by the expertise of other members of the Park Tudor faculty to consider gender through American literature, art and music. There will be two midterm tests and students will be expected to write several short papers and complete a final project. By the end of the term, students can expect to have a much better grasp of the impact that gender and race have on human societies and find themselves much more aware of the pervasive influence of gender and race on their own lives as they prepare to head off to college.

Southern Studies

Grades 9-12
Elective
Summer Only
Prerequisites: none

Students in this seminar will engage in a philosophical enquiry of how environment and place work to shape identity and culture. They are challenged to look at the South through the lenses of history, literature, music, art and architecture, and foodways. They will spend two weeks of classroom study followed by one week traveling to several Southern states in order to connect experientially with the landscape, geography and environment of the South. In keeping with the interdisciplinary nature of the class, artistic activity, broadly speaking, will be an important area of focus in this class. The class is reading and writing intensive, and students will also complete an interdisciplinary project—such as a photo journal, a travelogue, or a writing portfolio —as their final assessment.

Because we live in an interactive global community, the Upper School social studies curriculum focuses on creating an understanding of not only our own culture, but also those of other societies.

The Social Studies Department faculty engages students in discussions of both historical and modern cultural traditions, in both Western and Non-Western societies. Students learn to think critically about the various political, economic and social systems of the world.

Park Tudor Legacy Initiative

The Legacy Initiative project creates a unique experience for Upper School students to learn about wartime history. Through interviews and research, students have produced a series of books highlighting wartime memories from the American Revolution through the Gulf War. The Legacy Initiative has partnered with the Library of Congress Veteran History Project and the office of Indiana Senator Richard Lugar to document veterans’ oral histories. IUPUI has also joined the project, creating a digital database of Legacy Initiative interviews.

Model UN Program

Students in grades 8-12 have an opportunity to participate in Model United Nations programs in the United States and in The Hague, Netherlands. Underclassmen gain experience by preparing position statements for specific countries. Conference destinations include Dayton, Ohio; Chicago; Georgetown University and The Hague, Netherlands. Seniors who have gained experience from earlier conferences may be invited to attend the International Conference. Park Tudor has participated in this conference for more than 20 years and is one of only nine schools in the United States that is invited to attend. Visit the Model UN Blog for updates from each conference.

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